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"There is no applied research, there are only applications of basic research" Louis Pasteur
difficult swallowing, feeling of extraneous piece, changing voice, irritative cough, laryngitis/pharyngitis without infection PDF Print E-mail
To correctly understand this heading:
Remember that any stressed person who continuously clenches his teeth can elicite remote pain and associated dyscomforts from teeth (which are not only painful organs but also tactile one like the thumb and the index in opposite situation)
If You are interested the scientifical data are shown lower.
idee.jpg Don't forget to consult the associated headlings : "Clinical Data" and "Witness and experience"


POSSIBLE TROUBLES :

- hard swallowing
- feeling of extraneous part
- changing or raucous voice
- irritative cough
- laryngitis/pharyngitis (without infection)

Comment :

Important research about non-algic inputs that may come from teeth is surprising.
In a person under stress, teeth and jaw clenching may result in the trigeminal nerve exerting constant deleterious pressure (see: above) on the glossopharyngeal nerve (IX) and the vagus nerve (or parasympathetic ) (X).
The superior laryngeal nerve, a branch of the vagus nerve, is one of the nerves involved in a number of TMD symptoms including voice.
In that case, ORL doctors will generally not observe signs of inflammation.
.






scientific data
abstEtComment.jpg
In a person under stress, teeth and jaw clenching may result in the trigeminal nerve exerting constant deleterious pressure (see: above) on the glossopharyngeal nerve (IX) and the vagus nerve (or parasympathetic ) (X).
The superior laryngeal nerve, a branch of the vagus nerve, is one of the nerves involved in a number of TMD symptoms including voice.
In that case, ORL doctors will generally not observe signs of inflammation.
abstEtComment.jpg
MACHADO, Ilza Maria; BIANCHINI, Esther Mandelbaum Gonçalves; ANDRADA E SILVA, Marta Assumpção de and FERREIRA, Léslie Piccolotto. Voice and temporomandibular joint disorders in teachers. Rev. CEFAC online. 2009, vol.11, n.4, pp. 630-643. ISSN 1516-1846. doi: 10.1590/S1516-18462009000800012.
PURPOSE: to check the presence and possible correlation between vocal disorders and temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJD) in teachers, from self-reported speech pathological, medical and dental evaluation data. METHODS: 29 public school teachers from the city of Sorocaba - SP took part in this study. The teachers filled out a questionnaire about vocal disorders and on TMJD. The four following assessments were performed: auditory-perceptive, ENT medical assessment, oral-facial mobility, and a dental assessment. The mentioning about three or more symptoms in the questionnaire determined 'presence' of vocal and TMJD complaint. Both auditory-perceptive and ENT evaluations concluded whether there was 'presence' of voice and laryngeal disorders. TMJD was considered present when three or more signs or symptoms, necessarily including pain, were registered during oral-facial mobility and dental assessments. For statistical analysis of the data the following tests were applied: Two Proportions Equality Test, Fischer's Exact Test and Kappa Agreement Test.
RESULTS: among the participating subjects, 82.8% reported having a vocal disorder, and 62.1% reported TMJD symptoms; 51.7% showed vocal disorders in ENT evaluation, and 65.5% had TMJD according to dental assessments. When comparing vocal and TMJ disorder assessments, a significant correlation was present for auditory-perceptual and oral-facial mobility for TMJD, with a tendency towards significance also when applying the questionnaire.
CONCLUSION: the results point towards confirming the presence of TMJ and vocal disorders in the group of teachers in this research, as well as positive correlations between these two disorders.

Keywords : Voice; Voice Disorders; Faculty; Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction Syndrome; Facial Pain.

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Kampe T, Tagdae T, Bader G, Edman G, Karlsson S. Reported symptoms and clinical findings in a group of subjects with longstanding bruxing behaviour. J. Oral . Reab. 1997 Aug;24(8):581-7


Signs and symptoms of cranio-mandibular dysfunction (CMD) and social medical history were reported in 29 subjects, aged 23-68 years, with longstanding (5 years or more) bruxing behaviour. The subjects were selected from answers to an advertisement in the local newspaper. The subjects presented many symptoms of a general character including somatic and psycho-social problems, sleep disorders (72%), and pain (86%). More than half of the subjects (55%) had symptoms every day. Frequent aches in the neck, back, throat, shoulders were reported by 69% and frequent headache by 48% of the subjects. The most common symptoms of CMD were pain in the face or jaws (48%), stiffness in the jaws in the morning (44%), temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sounds (34%) and fatigue in the jaws during chewing (38%) and the most common clinical signs were more than three muscles tender on palpation (76%), TMJ-sounds (55%) and tenderness of TMJ on lateral palpation (66%). There was a statistically significant correlation between frequent tooth clenching and headache, pain in the neck, back, throat or shoulders,sleep disorders and high scores of the clinical dysfunction index (Di). The frequent clenchers had higher score values than the 'non-clenchers' for pain in the face and the jaws; headache; pain in the neck, back, throat or shoulders and the clinical dysfunction index (Di). These findings indicate a causal relationship between frequent tooth clenching and signs and symptoms of CMD, including headache and pain in the neck, back, throat or shoulders and high pathogenicity for frequent clenching.

 

Bibliography :

Amri M, Car A , Jean A, (1984) Medullary control of the pontine swallowing neurones in sheep , Exp Brain Res; 55: 105-10

Jean A (1984) Brainstem orgaization of the swallowing network. Brain Behav Evol; 25: 109-16

Jean A, Amri M, Calas A (1983) Connections between the ventral medullary swallowing area and the trigeminal motor nucleus of the sheep studied by tracing techniques. J Auton Nerv Syst 7: 87-96

Kessler J-P, Jean A (1985) Identification of th medullary swallowing regions in the rat. Exp Brain Res 57: 256-63

Last Updated on Thursday, 21 May 2015 00:12
 
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